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Daphne Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage - Bison Safaris - Best of Kenya budget and customized migration safaris

Daphne Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage

Elephants

Daphne Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage

$110.00

Located at The Nairobi National Park, Daphne Sheldrick’s Elephant Orphanage looks after and supports orphaned baby elephants and rhinos who have lost their mothers to poaching, death, injuries, on getting lost in the wild or other tragedies. Besides feeding, washing and walking the babies, Daphne and her dedicated staff of keepers provide emotional support to the orphans as they raise them to be released back into the wild when they are ready.
It is worth a visit to the park to see the young elephants interacting with their keepers – playing, taking mud baths and being fed with milk. This is a rare sight to watch and a most memorable way to get up close to the babies and observe their playful habits, something which is not possible or even safe during your safari in the wild.

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Daphe  Sheldrick  Elephant  Oprhanage  is  located at The Nairobi National Park, It  looks after and supports orphaned baby elephants and rhinos who have lost their mothers to poaching, death, injuries, on getting lost in the wild or other tragedies. Besides feeding, washing and walking the babies, Daphne and her dedicated staff of keepers provide emotional support to the orphans as they raise them to be released back into the wild when they are ready.

It is worth a visit to the park to see the young elephants interacting with their keepers – playing, taking mud baths and being fed with milk. This is a rare sight to watch and a most memorable way to get up close to the babies and observe their playful habits, something which is not possible or even safe during your safari in the wild.

Born from one family’s passion for Kenya and its wilderness, the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust was established more than 40 years ago and is best known for its Orphans’ Project, the first and most successful elephant orphan rescue and rehabilitation program in the world. The Sheldrick Trust is a pioneering conservation organisation, dedicated to the protection of wildlife and the preservation of habitats in East Africa.

. This orphanage for Elephant Calves and Rhinos from all over Kenya was founded and still managed by Daphne Sheldrick, the widow of one of Kenya’s best-known Game Wardens David Sheldrick. David Sheldrick was at the centre of the 1970’s Ivory poaching wars in Tsavo National Park. Today, the Sheldrick orphanage is a focal point for Elephant Conservation.

But the heyday of the elephant is long since past. Unlike the tribal residents of Kenya, colonists who arrived here in the 1800s saw  hunting as a sport and their tusks as a trophy. In the days of the Great White Hunter, big game hunters were said to have killed up to 1000 animals   each. Despite hunting being banned in the 1970s,  tusks and rhino horns are still seen as trophies.

The ivory trade is a roaring business and whilst it is banned in some countries, others continue to embrace this barbaric trade. The market value of ivory has increased as the commodity has become harder to get hold of. Poaching has risen in Kenya and animals   continue to sit high on the endangered animal list. Poaching is a business that makes millions and that demands the lives of 100’s  tusk bearesr   and rhinos every year.

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust works to rescue orphaned and injured animals   and rehabilitate them until they can be released back into the wild. In addition, it runs anti-poaching teams, mobile veterinary clinics and works to conserve areas of Kenya, which are being damaged by human encroachment.

Elephant calves orphaned by poaching are brought here from all over the country. They receive extremely specialized treatment here, and literally receive personal care 24 hours a day from highly dedicated staff who become surrogate mothers to the calves. The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is required to consider the physical and psychological well-being of the elephants. Whilst physical care is usually the most urgent it is the psychological aspects of rescuing elephants that need the most consideration.

In response to this, each elephant is assigned their own keeper, who in a sense replaces the lost elephant family. The Keeper cares for the elephant 24 hours a day; they feed and exercise the animals, but their role goes above and beyond normal duties. The Keepers sleep with the elephants at night, apply sunscreen in the heat and cover with blankets when cold.

The keepers care for the elephants as they would a child. Much like human children touch and love is important to them and tactile play and affection is an essential part of the role. The orphaned elephants will end up staying at the Trust until they reach maturity, some 10 -15 years. As they grow old, they are taken into the park in preparation for their release where they are carefully reintroduced into wild herds.  They learn how to find food and to be wary of predators.

The centre is open to the public each morning. At this time the calves are being exercised and bathed and visitors are free to watch. This is a good centre for general information on Elephants and their Conservation.

 

 

Elephants
Daphne Sheldrick Orphanage

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1st July-10 July, 1st June -15th June, 1st-15th Dec, April, August, December, February, January, July, June, March, May, November, October, September

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